As a family-owned and family-run business, corporate and social responsibility (CSR) has always been part of the fabric, even before it became the mainstream notion it is.

Undertaking charity challenges

At Adcock they like to ‘give something back’ to the local community. They support staff with charity endeavors that they choose to undertake in the UK and overseas by sponsoring them, sharing their fundraising missions and allowing them time to prepare, perform and recover. For those who like an active challenge, lots of grueling training is involved, as well as the final event itself!

Behind every story is a personal reason for wanting to help someone else or a good cause, and it only underlines the warm nature of the people who work for Adcock. Many team members undertake charity challenges, including the Directors.

Social communication difficulties

A few of Adcock’s employees’ recent achievements include:

  • Associate Director Steve Maclennan has just completed a 300-mile cycle ride in 20 hours for children’s charity, The Ark Centre, a purpose-built therapy center offering early intervention for children with autism or social communication difficulties. Departing from Paris and arriving in Chelmsford at the charity HQ, this was a heroic effort from Steve battling 14,000 feet of hills and helping raise almost £60,000.
  • Adcock staff team up every year to complete annual events like Chariots of Fire relay race in Cambridge for various charities including Papworth Hospital (a cause responding to the worldwide shortage of donor hearts), Alzheimer’s Research UK and the Cambridgeshire Community Foundation.
  • Their HR Manager, Catherine Smith, bravely climbed the UK’s highest mountain, Ben Nevis, at midnight (in the dark) for the Alzheimer’s Society, a charity very close to her heart.
  • Runners Jo and Hannah took part in the 5k and 10k Race for Life in Peterborough and Cambridge and engineer Sean undertook ‘Ultra Darts’ in Birmingham, all for Cancer Research UK.

Providing work experience

Adcock assisted a charity near Cambridge called Prospects Trust by helping cool down the farm shop kitchen

As a company, they also support a number of charities in local areas close to the regional offices across the UK through volunteering, fundraising, raising awareness of the charity and sponsorship. All activities are valuable to not-for-profit organizations and donations of time, expertise, assets and products can be just as beneficial.

Adcock assisted a charity near Cambridge called Prospects Trust by helping cool down the farm shop kitchen. The charity carries out some great projects providing work experience and training for adults with learning difficulties and health needs, so they installed an air conditioning system as their way of supporting their mission.

Air conditioning system

Adcock is a keen sponsor of team sports like rugby and football and has been instrumental in developing girls’ teams as well as the boys’. Adcock has provided the air conditioning system within the extension of Cambridge RFUC clubhouse, facilitating the introduction of a girls’ team. CRUFC and Adcock have a long-term relationship which has seen Adcock support the growth of the club through sponsorship and advertising. Donations from Adcock include the pitch-side clock and scoreboard.

Adcock also sponsored the Cambridgeshire FA new Advanced Coaching Centre (ACC) for girls

Adcock also sponsored the Cambridgeshire FA new Advanced Coaching Centre (ACC) for girls, providing a stepping-stone to the FA East Regional Girls’ Centre of Excellence. Adcock Chairman Phillip Prior actually played in the Cambridgeshire County League for Great Shelford and is very proud that Adcock was the first corporate sponsor of the girls’ league.

Various local charities

They are not bad at ‘losing’ either! After entering and sponsoring the Cambridge Rutherford Charity Golf Day for 21 years and never winning, ‘Adcock Cool Stars’ finally did claim first place in 2017, beating 25 teams! The day raised over £8,000 for various local charities including East Anglian Air Ambulance.

At Adcock they believe one doesn’t need to be super sporty, wacky or daring to donate time, effort and talent. One simply needs to pick a personal challenge and work diligently to achieve it. Together they are a stronger force and able to donate to many good causes in need of support.

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