Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRV) - Expert Commentary

Data-Driven Digital Solutions To Optimize Energy Efficiency In Buildings
Data-Driven Digital Solutions To Optimize Energy Efficiency In Buildings

Over the last decades heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems became significantly more energy efficient. This is immensely important as they are one of the largest energy-consuming loads in commercial and residential buildings. Smooth performance of the systems requires careful installation, thorough cleaning, and regular maintenance. Running an HVAC system (energy) efficiently is challenging because of constantly changing variables: people entering and leaving a building, changing temperatures and seasons which affect the heating, cooling, and air quality immensely. Research by the European Commission found that buildings are responsible for 40% of all European energy consumption. Emission reduction goals This has a significant environmental impact and will become more expensive over the next centuries while countries work on their net-zero and emission reduction goals. How can the HVAC industry, in cooperation with the green tech sector, ensure less energy consumption and fewer CO2 emissions? Are any other energy-saving options available? Energy-focused digital twins can be used for the planning, operation, and optimization of systems Following, three data-driven solutions for more energy efficiency in buildings are presented. To understand and operate a technical system it is necessary to have a precise understanding of the system’s parameters and boundaries. HVAC systems are installed in buildings. Buildings, although varying in size, purpose, and layout, can be described by a set of parameters called a digital twin. Energy-focused digital twins can be used for the planning, operation, and optimization of systems. Machine learning algorithms In HVAC applications, a digital twin can be used to design and operate equipment more precisely. It helps to detect defects quicker or even before a failure appears. This saves maintenance costs and reduces potential downtimes. The biggest potential of energy-focused digital twins might be the possibility to use those data sets to train machine learning algorithms. This allows the use of artificial intelligence to optimize HVAC systems. It can raise the energy efficiency of these systems and significantly reduce costs and CO2 emissions. Machine learning offers the HVAC industry immense possibilities. Tracking energy usage on building and room level generates a valuable data set that can be used to operate HVAC systems more energy efficient. Tracking room utilization AI can also consider the exact number of people present in the building when regulating the temperature One example of the use of AI to achieve more energy efficiency is temperature control in buildings. No matter what time of day or night, nor outside temperature or season, the AI algorithm can optimize the temperature in the building according to those variables. AI can also consider the exact number of people present in the building when regulating the temperature. This is important as the number of people and their body heat change the room temperature significantly. The system reacts to all variables by heating more or cooling down further. While it is possible to count people while entering and leaving a building, it is also possible to track their room utilization. The algorithm can not only notice the changing temperatures in rooms caused by body heat. Overall energy consumption It is also able to track where the lights are turned on and off and at what times. Possible reoccurring patterns in those actions can be identified by the algorithm. All this information can be considered when adapting building and room temperature. Tracking people’s actions gives AI detailed information to incorporate into the optimization processes to achieve more energy efficiency. In the same manner, air quality and humidity can be optimized. Especially in commercial buildings, the ventilation is often running too high Especially in commercial buildings, the ventilation is often running too high. Over ventilation is a large waste of energy. If fewer people are in the building it should be lowered to reduce the overall energy consumption. Especially in a work environment, both temperature and ventilation are of high importance, as it has a direct impact on the productivity of most people. Smart control system A smart control system will process all available data on the energy usage in a building and adjust the HVAC system accordingly, in real-time. The more information it can gather for a longer period, the better the system becomes. This saves energy, emits less CO2 and reduces costs. A manual adjustment will never be as efficient, as the number of variables is too large. Additionally, AI can identify any irregularities occurring in the HVAC system and alert the responsible person. Predictive maintenance ensures less downtime. Voltage optimization based on a building’s energy consumption data is a solution that can also enhance energy efficiency in buildings. It can be applied to reduce costs, electrical energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Optimizing the voltage level in real-time means reducing it to a lower level, based on the consumption of the building. Highest savings level The CE certification shows that fluctuations of voltage can be tolerated by a device Electrical energy is supplied to buildings by grid operators. They are supposed to supply 230 V. However, a constant voltage level cannot be guaranteed. The voltage fluctuates. Therefore, all electronic devices must be able to work within those fluctuations. They allow a range of plus and minus 10%, which is compulsory by law. The CE certification shows that fluctuations of voltage can be tolerated by a device. 10% of 230 V allows the reduction of the voltage level to a minimum level of 207 V. At this level, all devices in buildings are guaranteed to run smoothly. Every volt above 207 V can thus be considered more than necessary for the devices to work properly. This means, that at the highest savings level, all devices still work within their specifications. Lower electricity costs But with a lower voltage, the energy consumption is lower. Consuming less energy results in a reduced carbon footprint and lower electricity costs. The advancement of technology and availability of higher resolution data already allows building managers to look at optimizing HVAC systems for better energy efficiency, especially in newer buildings where those systems are installed right away. Consuming less energy results in a reduced carbon footprint and lower electricity costs This provides less energy consumption and less CO2 emissions. As buildings and their HVAC systems are consuming large amounts of energy which emits tons of CO2 every year, enhancing the energy efficiency in buildings becomes crucial on the way to net-zero. Energy-Saving solutions HVAC systems must work with the highest energy efficiency possible, considering that the weather extremes we are experiencing all over the world (colder winters and hotter summers) will increase the demand for them, if not make them indispensable. But these solutions are not only available for new buildings. Existing buildings can also be retrofit by their owners and operators to take advantage of the emerging data-driven trends in the green tech industry. Energy-saving solutions like voltage optimization can significantly reduce buildings’ carbon footprints. Combing several different data-driven energy-saving solutions will reduce the carbon emissions in the building sector significantly.

What We Breathe And What We Feel: Designing Today’s Homes For Optimal IEQ
What We Breathe And What We Feel: Designing Today’s Homes For Optimal IEQ

Most people spend about 90 percent of their time indoors. For home owners, indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is the most meaningful differentiator between ‘high-performance’ and ‘code-built’ homes. Indoor environmental quality  IEQ describes how well the indoor environment promotes occupant comfort and health. The components of IEQ include thermal comfort, indoor air quality (IAQ), sound and lighting. Requirements for optimal IEQ vary per occupant and household, due to individual health needs and levels of sensitivity to sound, light, color and temperature. Let’s discuss how to control the indoor environment for IEQ with particular attention to how heat pumps can help improve thermal comfort and IAQ. Start with the Building Envelope A healthy and comfortable home with optimal IEQ can be considered a single system A healthy and comfortable home with optimal IEQ can be considered a single system, which consists of interdependent parts and sub systems. Mechanical system designers give careful consideration to how components perform, in relation to each other and other variables. Code requirements for tighter building envelopes, improved windows, increased insulation values and more efficient appliances have reduced energy use intensity (EUI), since the 1970s, but also provide the foundation for better performing homes. Optimal IEQ requires control over how air, thermal energy (heat) and moisture enter, exit and flow through the building. Limit Thermal Bridging A thermal bridge is an area that has higher thermal conductivity than the surrounding materials, creating a path of least resistance for heat transfer. Thermal bridges reduce energy efficiency and create health and comfort challenges. When the components of a building assembly are made colder than the air in those spaces, there is the potential for condensation. This can reduce the durability of the building and create potential health hazards, such as mold. When designing high performance homes for maximum efficiency, health and comfort, choose techniques and products, like continuous exterior insulation and windows with low U-values, so as to eliminate limit thermal bridging. Heat Pumps and Thermal Comfort Comfort is a subjective experience, affected by variables, including the occupant’s age, level of physical activity and where they were raised. ASHRAE Standard 55 and the Predictive Mean Vote (PMV) concept use five factors to help builders design comfortable environments that are specific to occupants: Operative temperature Air speed Relative humidity Metabolic rate Occupant clothing High performance heat pump with variable speed compressor A high performance heat pump with a variable speed compressor can meet the challenge of subjective comfort, while improving the home’s energy efficiency. Heat pumps use the natural movement of thermal energy from hotter objects to colder objects, in order to heat or cool the home’s zones. In heating mode, the outdoor unit expands refrigerant gas to make it colder than the ambient air, enabling the unit to extract thermal energy from the outdoor air and transfer it via refrigerant lines to the indoor unit, conditioning the zone. Using this method, a heat pump can provide more energy for heating than it consumes in electricity. Even at low ambient temperatures, modern, all-electric heat pumps can be up to three times more efficient than conventional electrical-resistance systems. Heat pump systems with individually-controlled indoor units Heat pump systems with individually-controlled indoor units for each zone create opportunities to customize comfort, for specific occupants and activities (e.g., cooking, exercise, sleep). Using multiple independent units and compact duct runs offers more flexibility to design, according to occupant preferences. If the cost of changing ductwork in an existing house is prohibitive, ductless indoor units may be the solution. Performance can be improved by applying a heat pump system with a compact duct design Compact Duct Design for Heat Pumps Performance can be further improved by applying a heat pump system with a compact duct design, instead of a large, conventional duct design. During heating season, thermal energy is lost as conventional systems push conditioned air through long duct runs in unconditioned spaces. This heat loss through ducts can result in comfort issues and poor energy performance. In compact designs, duct runs are shorter and more centralized, with ducts running to interior walls and blowing toward exterior walls. With shorter duct runs and less opportunity for energy loss, contractors can install smaller indoor units with smaller and quieter fans that use less energy. Ductless indoor units for heat pump systems, such as recessed ceiling cassettes or wall mounts, don’t require ducts. Ducted air handlers and horizontal-ducted units are compact, making it easier to fit all the HVAC equipment and ductwork within the envelope. Indoor Air Quality Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is particular to occupants, but less subjective than comfort Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is particular to occupants, but less subjective than comfort. The primary objective of IAQ design is keeping pollutants from endangering occupant health. Contaminants of concern include particulate matter 2.5 (PM 2.5), acrolein, formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). PM 2.5, for example, can contribute to asthma, sinus congestion, coughing, skin rashes, brain plaque and cognitive issues, including headaches and sleep disturbances. Source control is the foundation of IAQ. In designing healthy homes, builders should avoid materials that off-gas formaldehyde and VOCs to limit the infiltration of pollutants. All-electric heat pumps align with the trend of limiting or eliminating the hazards of on-site fossil fuel combustion in healthy homes. After addressing source control, builders can apply methods and products for filtration, elimination and dilution. Whole-home Filtration The Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) uses a scale of 1-20 to describe how effectively a filter can capture particles of a given size. A High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter (HEPA) with a MERV range of 17 to 20 and can remove 99.97% of airborne particles as small as 0.3 micrometers. When determining the level of filtration required, the impact of the static pressure drops associated with increases in the efficacy and depth of pleated filters considered. The duct design and Manual D calculations must account for pressure drops which cause air to move more slowly. Homes with multiple zones may have a mix of indoor unit styles, including ductless and ducted units. If a home owner requires higher filtration levels, HVAC contractors can install a complementary system purpose-built for whole-home filtration. High performance ventilation systems, ERVs and HRVs Healthy and comfortable homes use high performance ventilation systems to introduce fresh outdoor air. An energy recovery ventilator (ERV) or heat recovery ventilator (HRV) provides conditioned ventilation air to dilute pollutants and remove stale air, without significantly increasing heating or cooling loads. Humidity-balanced, conditioned fresh air may be directed to the air handler or ducted directly to zones served by ductless units. With modern construction methods, mechanical systems, knowledge of human physiology and help from immutable physical laws, HVAC contractors can help produce homes purpose-built for occupant comfort and health.

Reducing Your HVAC Carbon Footprint: How The Sector Can Become More Sustainable In The Journey To Net Zero
Reducing Your HVAC Carbon Footprint: How The Sector Can Become More Sustainable In The Journey To Net Zero

With ongoing efforts from governments across the globe to reduce carbon emissions and with an ever greater focus on sustainability, it is vital that the HVAC sector does its part in becoming more environmentally conscious. And, while there have been steps to become more sustainable, there is a huge amount that still needs to be done to make sure that many of the targets that have been set are attainable. In buildings, both large and small, industrial heating accounts for roughly two thirds of industrial energy demand and around a fifth of global energy consumption. Figures like this show the need to have efficient and environmentally-friendly HVAC equipment in place to make the crucial steps towards reducing the contributions these systems make to our carbon footprint. High energy consumption in construction sector A 2019 report by The International Environment Agency (IEA) showed that the buildings and construction sectors combined were responsible for over 30% of global energy consumption and nearly 40% of carbon emissions. This is indicative of the steps the sector needs to take to play its role in a more eco-friendly society, some of which are already underway. However, much more needs to be done if the UK is to reach its goal of reaching net zero carbon emissions by 2050. As we envisage what a post-COVID world might look like, businesses and governments are continuing to put sustainability and lower carbon emissions at the forefront of their planning and the HVAC sector is certainly no exception. But with change in the sector a daunting prospect, decision-makers often don’t know where to start. Smart Technology use in HVAC systems Smart HVAC uses sensors that integrate with a building’s automation system With the constant growth and greater deployment of smart technologies within the HVAC sector, this is certainly a way that systems can become more efficient. Smart HVAC uses sensors that integrate with a building’s automation system. These sensors then collect information about conditions throughout the building. Heat waves are now a far more common occurrence in the United Kingdom. The Met Office estimates they are up to 30 times more likely and will be a bi-annual occurrence by 2050. It is important that any uptake in HVAC usage doesn’t lead to a drastic increase in emission generation. This is one of the areas where smart systems will become crucial. Many scientists have been unequivocal in their sentiment that heat waves are a cause of greater emissions and expect temperature records in the UK and Europe to be broken more regularly, so sites will need to be equipped to handle these conditions. Regulating temperature with hand-held devices With wireless systems now much more commonplace, temperatures can be controlled easily from hand-held devices. With these new technologies, those managing the systems can also benefit from remote monitoring and maintenance, reducing the need to travel to the site for yet another environmental incentive. To accompany the smart systems, equipment including smart thermostats can be installed to maximize HVAC efficiency. Other smart systems available to businesses include smart furnaces and air conditioning units that are far easier to operate than their traditional counterparts. Reducing unnecessary ventilation While global temperatures continue to rise, air conditioning usage has increased and has contributed to greater levels of energy usage. A huge amount of needless emissions are generated by unnecessary ventilation, contributing heavily to heat loss and overall energy wastage. Recirculation of air is a traditionally lower energy cost method of retaining heat and keeping emissions low, however, we must be mindful of the risks associated with recirculating air. The risk of circulating diseases is negated somewhat with heat recovery ventilation, which both removes the risk of disease spreading and improves energy consumption. Efficiency performance of new AC units Air conditioning units in particular contribute significantly to a building’s energy consumption Air conditioning units in particular contribute significantly to a building’s energy consumption, equating to 10% of the UK’s electricity consumption and as such it is important that we bear in mind ways to counteract the emissions this creates. Global energy demand for air conditioning units is expected to triple by 2050, as temperatures continue to rise year on year. The efficiency performance of new air conditioning units will be the key, when it comes to ensuring that escalating demand does not equate to greater emissions. Another issue for suppliers and manufacturers to address is differing rates of consumption for AC units in different countries, with units sold in Japan and the EU typically more efficient than those found in China and the US. Modularization Modular HVACs have also become increasingly popular in recent years. Modular HVACs are responsible for heating, cooling and distributing air through an entire building, with their increase in popularity largely down to their greater levels of energy efficiency, cost effectiveness, flexibility and substantial ease of installation and maintenance. Modular HVACs can be tailored specifically for workspaces and they often allow work to be done on the systems without disturbing the workforce, achieved primarily through rooftop placement. Commercial workspaces are larger and often require differing needs to residential properties and can cater to a wide range of the specific requirements of work and commercial spaces. As we strive for lower carbon emissions, it seems that this trend will continue and will become a key area in reducing emissions that HVACs have traditionally generated. System maintenance and training To meet government and industry requirements, many new buildings will require HVAC systems that can be maintained simply in order to perform in a more energy efficient way. Many companies are looking at ways to become climate neutral and significantly reduce their footprint Many companies are looking at ways to become climate neutral and significantly reduce their footprint. Companies are following the likes of German-based company, Wilo Group, who have announced they are committing to sustainable manufacturing by developing a new carbon neutral plant and HQ in the next few years. Lowering carbon footprint As we continue to move towards an ever more environmentally conscious society, it will be of paramount importance for companies, governments and the public to think about ways in which we can lower carbon emissions. Smart technologies will certainly be at the forefront of this, negating many needless journeys and making it easier for industries to adjust settings and tackle issues remotely. Greater levels of training will help equip us with the tools to make sure we are best placed to reduce emissions and be more sustainable as a result. While the steps outlined above do show some progress and measures we can take, there is far more that we can do as a sector to significantly reduce HVAC’s carbon footprint and once we have moved beyond the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, this will surely be at the front of industry leader minds.

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TZOA Becomes HAVEN To Provide An Entirely Fresh Approach To Air Quality Management
TZOA Becomes HAVEN To Provide An Entirely Fresh Approach To Air Quality Management

TZOA pioneers of smart air quality technology for HVAC professionals and their homeowner customers, becomes HAVEN and announces the launch of the HAVEN central air controller. Along with the bold new look and brand comes an entirely fresh approach to air quality management. Combined with the existing HAVEN central air monitor, the HAVEN controller builds an ecosystem that makes any HVAC system smarter and homes healthier by detecting harmful pollutants and automatically circulating fresh air within the home. Central HVAC systems HVAC systems are typically used for comfort to heat and cool the home. Recent environmental issues such as heatwaves and forest fires, and health concerns such as COVID-19, have increased awareness of the need for improved air quality (IAQ) and led to a surge of interest in room air purifiers. HAVEN’s air purifying solution manages the whole home using the existing central HVAC systems Compared with other products that are loud, inefficient and take up living space, HAVEN’s air purifying solution automatically manages the whole home using the existing central HVAC systems to better address these concerns. Introduced in 2020, the HAVEN central air monitor is unlike other IAQ devices as it is the only system mounted directly within the duct, where it can monitor airborne pollutants across the entire home. Large sized homes It combines the diagnostic power of miniaturized, research-grade particulate sensing lasers and chemical sensors to detect levels of airborne contaminants such as dust, pollen, pet dander, odors, and materials off-gassing. The addition of the HAVEN central air controller allows for the HAVEN system to automatically control an HVAC system and ancillary equipment, taking action and responding by optimizing filtration, ventilation, or humidity levels on-demand. “Room air purifiers are great for cleaning small spaces such as apartments, yet few know that for average to large sized homes, our existing HVAC systems are the best method for circulating the air and capturing contaminants," explained Kevin Hart, CEO and Founder of HAVEN. Additional software services The HAVEN ecosystem is the first to monitor airflow and controls filtration, ventilation and humidity “We developed the HAVEN brand and ecosystem to allow any HVAC system to deliver clean air, as well as comfort. Today, more than ever, it is essential your home is safe, healthy, and free of pollutants that can harm your family. Our new name, look and feel reflects our fresh approach to air quality management, and we look forward to bringing it into millions of homes in North America.” Over the coming year, HAVEN will expand its ecosystem and develop more advanced algorithms and additional software services for Homeowners and HVAC professionals. It also plans to expand its sales channel. The flow of air within the home is the most important factor in improving air quality. The HAVEN ecosystem is the first to monitor airflow and controls filtration, ventilation and humidity, the three critical pillars that air movement enables. Detecting harmful particles HAVEN improves the air even further by avoiding the build-up of hyper-local airborne contamination caused by stagnant air, and leverages the proven IAQ approach of dilution and dispersion. Already deployed in thousands of homes, the HAVEN Monitor uses the ‘arteries’ of the home, aka ductwork, to capture an understanding of how the indoor environment is doing. It uses individually calibrated lasers that scatter light across the moving air within the duct to detect harmful particles known as PM2.5. HAVEN improves the air even further by avoiding the build-up of hyper-local airborne contamination It monitors air pollution and comfort levels, including chemicals known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), relative humidity, air velocity, and temperature to indicate whether a home needs improved filtration, ventilation or humidity control. Information is delivered to homeowners via the HAVEN IAQ app and to HVAC professionals via the HAVEN Pro web portal. Monitoring air quality Transmitted via WIFI, the app provides 24/7 air quality insights and historical data. The app also provides notifications and alerts as well as recommendations such as IAQ-friendly cleaning tips. In addition, it has an in-app ‘Contact your HAVEN Pro’ function to connect with technicians to address any major concerns, such as upgrading filters during wildfire events. The web portal allows HVAC professionals to monitor air quality for multiple customers within a single dashboard. Perfect for service/maintenance contracts, it provides individually tailored reports and ongoing touchpoints with customers to foster trust and long-term sales. The HAVEN Controller works in harmony with the monitor to intelligently automate and adjust HVAC equipment when necessary. Connected to specific terminals of the HVAC system, it enables the professional installer or homeowner to use the data from the monitor to create custom circulation schedules. Indoor air pollution This ensures air is circulated at specific times when particulate matter may increase This ensures air is circulated at specific times when particulate matter may increase and can intuitively trigger equipment when an air quality issue is identified: e.g activate filtration when cooking particles are detected, or turn on ventilation when high VOCs are detected. Using the data, a contractor can also assess the need for equipment maintenance to ensure optimal performance. Considering 90% of people’s time is spent indoors, and that indoor air pollution is typically 2- 5 times worse than pollution outside, it is not a surprise there has been a surge in demand for IAQ devices and purifiers. Providing additional services HAVEN has a different approach to standalone devices that can only impact a single room. By building an ecosystem, it provides a solution throughout the entire home. In addition, through its HAVEN Pro offering, the company provides HVAC professionals with platforms to generate increased sales and provide additional services to customers. The HAVEN ecosystem is now available through HVAC contractors across the U.S. and Canada. HAVEN products are carried by some of the largest HVAC distributors including Goodman, Amana & Daikin, Steven’s Equipment Supply, East Coast Metals, Crescent Parts & Equipment, TruTech Tools.

Why Hybrid Heat Pumps Deserve Their Moment In The Spotlight
Why Hybrid Heat Pumps Deserve Their Moment In The Spotlight

With the UK committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050, drastic action is needed by the government. For new-build homes, there’s a gas boiler ban coming in less than five years’ time. And for older properties, it’s likely that gas prices will continue to rise, to encourage homeowners to switch to a more sustainable alternative. Renewable heating market With this in mind, the renewable heating market is growing rapidly, albeit from a very small base – but with targets in place to keep the momentum up. The government has committed to install 600,000 heat pumps into new homes by 2028. The government has committed to install 600,000 heat pumps into new homes by 2028 People who are already living in (old and new) properties heated by renewable technology should be applauded for pioneering it – but understandably, not everyone has the confidence to give up a solution they’re familiar with, and to step into the relative unknown. And that’s why the value of transitional technologies cannot be over-estimated– both to homeowners who want to live more sustainably and to installers looking to adapt and future-proof their businesses. But the role that hybrid heat pumps can play in accelerating progress on the road to zero has been somewhat overlooked to date. Hybrid heat pumps Hybrid heat pumps combine the power of a heat pump with the familiarity of a high-efficiency boiler. The two appliances work together to provide heating and hot water, providing the ideal replacement for a combi boiler as a first step towards introducing renewable heating technology into the home. Compared to a traditional gas boiler, hybrid heat pump systems can reduce CO2 emissions by as much as 55% and have been proven to deliver up to a 50% reduction in energy bills in homes in the UK. Our Daikin Altherma hybrid heat pump’s smart programming helps to save up to 35% more energy than a traditional condensing boiler by automatically determining the most economically and energy-efficient operating combination based on energy prices, outdoor temperatures, and indoor heat capacity. Heat pump share The hybrid system’s operating mode can be shifted to more electric heat pump share As well as being quick to install, hybrid systems are designed to look and operate like a conventional boiler system and deliver like-for-like performance and comfort levels. And to give homeowners peace of mind, the heat pump can act as a back-up for the boiler, and vice-versa – meaning they’ll never be caught short. Hybrid systems are best-suited to smaller homes in urban areas, that are likely to have a combi-boiler, and where the shell of the building is not energy-efficient enough to rely on electricity alone. But as the efficiency of the building is improved and upgraded over time, the hybrid system’s operating mode can be shifted to more electric heat pump share. And while there’s a lot of talk about new homes in the renewable heating debate, hybrid technology is ideal for renovations and boiler replacements. Heating system replacements We estimate that there are 1.1 million homes across the country that would be well-served by a hybrid system. That, combined with the benefits of hybrids for both installers and consumers, is why we firmly believe in hybrid heat pumps’ potential to support a faster, easier, and more affordable transition to low carbon heating in this country. Every homeowner who buys a Daikin Altherma hybrid system gets a high-efficiency boiler for free When consumers are looking at heating system replacements, we know that complexity and disruption are barriers to purchase. Fortunately, neither is an issue with hybrids. While hybrid heat pump systems can be installed with a household’s existing boiler, to help increase uptake, we’re running a special offer at the moment whereby every homeowner who buys a Daikin Altherma hybrid system gets a brand-new, high-efficiency boiler for free. Low carbon technology And there’s no need to lose valuable floor space to a hot water cylinder or to make changes to the radiators. Hybrids aren’t just good news for homeowners; they represent a real opportunity for installers, too. At the moment, there are 1,000 heat pump installers in the UK and around 125,000 gas boiler installers. We need to transition these boiler installers towards low carbon technology – not just to drive progress on the road to net zero, but to help their businesses stay relevant and competitive. This year, in partnership with 11 of our Daikin Sustainable Home Centres across the UK, we’re running a free nationwide training program to help installers enter the renewable heating market with hybrid heat pumps. eco-Friendly hybrid solution Reducing electricity prices isn’t enough to encourage people to change the way they heat their homes Installers who complete the day-long course can expand their portfolio and gain the skills to upgrade customers to an eco-friendly hybrid solution. Reducing electricity prices isn’t enough to encourage people to change the way they heat their homes; more needs to be done to make new, clean technologies accessible and appealing. We’re doing what we can to incentivize homeowners – and installers – to embrace the possibilities of a hybrid heat pump system, but a clear funding mechanism from Government is needed as well, specifically to help with the upfront cost of upgrading (free boiler or no free boiler). While the now-closed Green Homes Grant explicitly included hybrid heat pump technology, there’s a big question as to whether the same hybrid solutions will be included in the Clean Heat Grant – the details of which are expected later this year. The answer to that question needs to be ‘yes’.

HTS To Represent An Innovative Line Of Indoor DOAS Products From Oxygen8
HTS To Represent An Innovative Line Of Indoor DOAS Products From Oxygen8

HTS is pleased to announce that HTS New England is now representing an innovative line of Indoor DOAS products from Oxygen8. Oxygen8, a new and innovative HVAC equipment design and manufacturing company, launched a line of fully electric Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems (DOAS) to meet the needs of modern building design and to address current human health and climate change challenges. Clean tech entrepreneur, James Dean (Founder of dPoint/CORE), and HVAC engineer, Matthew Doherty (formerly with Swegon), have teamed up to create intelligent, future-facing HVAC solutions to improve health, comfort, and energy efficiency for offices, senior care facilities, classrooms, and other commercial buildings across North America.  Energy recovery technology Oxygen8 systems use membrane-based energy recovery technology and integrate Daikin’s VRV heating and cooling systems to provide 100% fresh, filtered air to indoor environments at an ideal temperature and humidity levels. The low profile design beautifully integrates into compact spaces and allows for ceiling, wall or floor mounted installation, providing 400-3500cfm of outside air directly indoors, preventing recirculation of air and cross-contamination of airborne viruses and bacteria. The current COVID-19 crisis has identified a need to implement better ways to ventilate buildings" “Our cities and workplaces are changing and it’s time that HVAC solutions followed suit.” explains Oxygen8 CEO James Dean. “Throughout North America, cities are moving toward net-zero energy and low carbon to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The current COVID-19 crisis has identified a need to implement better ways to ventilate buildings and keep people healthy, safe and comfortable.” Rooftop HVAC equipment “Building owners and developers are looking to maximize their usable space and eliminate bulky rooftop HVAC equipment and ductwork. It was these challenges that inspired us to develop the next generation of ventilation products.” Breathe healthy with high IAQ - Low energy fans, fixed plate enthalpy exchangers, and high-MERV filters deliver 100% fresh, outdoor air to designated building zones, eliminating crossover and recirculation of contaminants while keeping relative humidity at healthy levels. Innovative design - Compact (16”, 20”, 24” or 30” deep), the decentralized design allows for seamless ceiling or wall installation, ensuring maximum usable floor or roof space, while ECM fans and double-wall construction make for a quiet operation. Energy efficient - 100% electric HVAC system with energy recovery makes for a more energy-efficient system and small carbon footprint. Smart solutions - Technology connects HVAC systems to smart devices for easy monitoring and maintenance, with real-time filter alerts, demand-controlled ventilation, and remote diagnosis. Climate controlled - Connectivity with the HVAC equipment from Daikin allows cutting-edge, fully integrated ERV and VRV systems that control temperature and humidity levels for unparalleled comfort and health. Easy installation and maintenance - Pre-installed coils, electronic expansion valves, and controls, plus easy-to-access filters and an ERV core with no moving parts ensures systems are easy to install and maintain.

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