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Now Is The Time To Prepare For A Boom In Heat Pump Sales
Now Is The Time To Prepare For A Boom In Heat Pump Sales

As the UK continues to battle through the coronavirus crisis, HVAC business owners and installers can be putting some of their enforced downtime to good use. This period of subdued trading is a rare opportunity to get into better shape for when economic activity picks up. One way of doing this is by sharpening the focus on markets which promise strong growth – and few markets are growing faster than that for heat pumps.   The potential here is huge. Some 28,000 heat pumps are currently installed in the UK every year, and before the pandemic this number was rising annually at a rate of 15-30%. That equates to sales doubling every three to five years. New-builds account for the majority of those sales, but 30% are retrofits, and about 30% of those retrofits are in private residences. This means there’s a big opportunity for doing conversions from oil boilers to heat pumps at rural homes not connected to the gas grid. The ‘New Normal’ and Heat Pumps It is only realistic, of course, to expect a lingering dip in HVAC sales of all kinds, including heat pumps, until the post-pandemic world gets back on its feet. But when we do turn the corner into the ‘new normal’, heat pump sales will again climb strongly. One reason for this is consumer demand, the other is government policy. End-users are now increasingly aware of the dangers and disruptions threatened by carbon emissions and climate change – informally known as ‘the Blue Planet Effect’ – and more are being guided by their consciences to make environmentally-responsible heating choices. An Expected Spike In Demand Many end-users are also encouraged by the prospect of receiving payments from the government through the Domestic RHI tariff. When we do turn the corner into the ‘new normal’, heat pump sales will climb strongly If RHI tariffs are the carrot, however, the government is also going to wield a big stick. The Chancellor’s spring statement last year dropped the bombshell that low-carbon heating systems, not fossil-fuel heating, should be installed in all new homes built after 2025. Though this policy might perhaps get slightly delayed and diluted, there can be no doubting that radical change is on the way.           With all this in the pipeline, the industry should be preparing now to cope with the increased demand. But there’s some way to go: of the UK’s 120,000 registered gas engineers, merely 600 or so are MCS-registered to install heat pumps. Many more will be needed. MCS Certification Some installers are already recognizing this opportunity. Some 28,000 heat pumps are currently installed in the UK every year, and before the pandemic this number was rising annually at a rate of 15-30% This is evident in the heightened level of interest in the one-day introductory heat pump courses run nationwide by the Viessmann Academy. These courses provide a useful overview of what heat pump installations involve, helping participants decide whether or not they would like to go on to qualify with the MCS quality assurance scheme. This is a crucial decision, because having MCS certification is an obligation when installing equipment eligible for Domestic RHI payments. Some course participants decide to take the next step to MCS certification straight away, others decide to wait a while – but standing still in a fast-moving market can mean getting left behind! F-Gas Certification So what else must HVAC businesses and installers consider about heat pumps, in order to stay ahead of the game? In addition to MCS certification, F-Gas certification is also necessary when split air source heat pumps are installed. This is because the outdoor and indoor units have to be connected on-site with refrigerant pipework. Some installers choose to get F-Gas certified themselves, others sub-contract this part of the job to someone who’s suitably qualified. Of the UK’s 120,000 registered gas engineers, merely 600 or so are MCS-registered to install heat pumps It is possible to sidestep this need, however, when it is appropriate to install a monobloc heat pump – and the widening choice and affordability of monobloc designs is making them appropriate for a wider range of properties. A good example of this is Viessmann’s new Vitocal 100-A, an outdoors unit which has no need for a complementary indoor unit and is also easy to install because most components are integrated in the unit. New, compact and affordable air source heat pumps such as this, offering much-needed space-saving solutions for urban homes, are another reason why the heat pump market will boom. The Challenges Of Heat Pump Installation Though technological advances are making things easier, installing a heat pump isn’t ever going to be quite as straightforward as replacing an old boiler with a new one. Before starting an installation, first it is necessary to assess whether a heat pump is suitable for the property. This means checking that the property is well-enough insulated; checking the existing system’s radiators, which may need supplementing or replacing with bigger radiators or underfloor heating because of the lower flow temperatures of a heat pump system; and calculating the required size of the heat pump according to the building’s heat loss (and not including hot water demand). This period of subdued trading is a rare opportunity to get into better shape for when economic activity picks up At the installation stage itself, much of the work will be familiar to boiler installers, though weather compensating controls are obligatory for all MCS-approved work and as part of building regulations Part L. It’s also important to note that planning permission requires minimum distances between the heat pump’s outdoor unit, the plot’s borders, and neighboring properties. If this seems complicated, it doesn’t have to be: some heat pump manufacturers provide a calculator to simplify the task. Now Is The Time To Be Proactive Just as installers need a little time to assess whether a property should switch from a boiler to a heat pump, end-users also need a little thinking time, to consider adopting a technology new to them. By being proactive, HVAC businesses and installers can reap what they sow When customers get in touch because their existing boiler has broken down, the pressure for a quick fix can rule this out. But right now, when many of us have time on our hands, there’s the chance to inform customers of alternative heating solutions before their boiler needs replacing. Taking such pre-emptive action, by emailing information or mailing leaflets to customers, does require a little effort, but at least now there’s the time to do it. We are heading into a new era which will see boiler sales decline while heat pump sales rise. By making preparations for these profound changes, and by being proactive, HVAC businesses and installers can reap what they sow.

Strategic Electrification And The HVAC Industry’s Role
Strategic Electrification And The HVAC Industry’s Role

Strategic electrification encompasses a host of solutions aimed at decarbonizing Earth’s atmosphere, decreasing pollution and reducing the costs of modern comfort and technology. Also known as “beneficial electrification”, this movement requires increased energy efficiency and end uses powered with electricity from cleaner grids and renewable sources. The movement will transform both the built environment and society’s modes of transportation. Despite the complexity of its challenges, strategic electrification can no longer be dismissed as a niche or a possibility of the far future. The movement is happening now, driven by a mix of public and private entities on various levels proceeding along voluntary and mandatory paths. What Is Being Done? In the absence of formal federal action on climate change — including the Clean Power Plan and Paris Accord — cities, states, municipalities and utilities are continuing to develop their own decarbonization strategies. There are now nearly 450 cities in the U.S. that have committed to 80% carbon reductions by 2050 The goal is to achieve this through a variety of policy mandates such as taxes, building codes and portfolio standards. This is in addition to voluntary approaches that can include utility rebates and construction decisions such as choosing a passive house design; updated building efficiency targets; system-specific electric mandates; and comprehensive gas bans. Just recently, Santa Cruz became the 30th city or county in California to enact a measure limiting or prohibiting the use of natural gas in new construction, according to an article published by Yale Environment 360.  The Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance Many organizations have rallied around these strategies. For instance, the Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (CNCA) is one of the many organizations that have rallied around the strategies that must be employed to reach carbon neutrality. CNCA is a collaboration of leading global cities working to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80-100% by 2050 or sooner. They’ve adopted some of the most aggressive GHG reduction targets undertaken anywhere by any city. Mitsubishi Electric Trane HVAC US was one of the organization’s first HVAC participants, providing expertise and product knowledge to support their continued efforts. Major CNCA cities include New York City, NY, San Francisco, CA and Washington, DC. If We Don’t Electrify, How Could That Impact the Environment? Cities are working aggressively to reduce fossil fuel use because our CO2 levels are trending in a dangerous direction. As a naturally-occurring greenhouse gas (GHG), CO2 helps earth retain enough warmth to sustain life but too much can lead to excessive warming. If our global energy demand grows and we continue to use fossil fuels in the same way, the average amount of atmospheric CO2 will likely exceed 900 ppm by the year 2100 For 800,000 years, before the Industrial Revolution and the widespread adoption of fossil fuel-burning technologies, the highest global average atmospheric amount of CO2 was 300 parts per million (ppm), according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 407 ppm is the current average amount, per a trend report published by the Global Carbon Project. The NOAA also reports that if our global energy demand grows and we continue to use fossil fuels in the same way, the average amount of atmospheric CO2 will likely exceed 900 ppm by the year 2100. As atmospheric CO2 increases, the global temperature also increases, potentially reaching 1.5° C above pre-industrial levels between 2030 and 2052. At this temperature, the majority of climate scientists expect environmental changes to include rising sea levels, increased flooding, droughts, extreme heat, wildfires and new risks to human lives, infrastructure and biodiversity. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, buildings (residential and commercial) account for nearly 40% of the nation’s total energy demand — and about 75% of all electricity use. Where Does The HVAC Industry Fit In? Worldwide, all-electric heat pumps are the most popular technology for decarbonizing heating and cooling. VRF heat pumps and heat-recovery systems contribute to lower carbon footprints and benefit strategic electrification by reducing overall costs for commercial building owners, consumers and society. Instead of burning fossil fuels, a VRF heat pump provides heating to zones by introducing ambien heat its outdoor unit extracts from the air or a nearby water source. During cooling, VRF heat pumps reverse this process as indoor units transfer heat from zones to the outdoor unit which then rejects the heat. Until recently, some specifiers in northern regions felt obligated to select a gas-powered furnace or electric resistance for heating systems due to air-source heat pump derating at sub-freezing temperatures. Today that’s not the case. Mitsubishi Electric Trane HVAC US' SUZ universal outdoor unit uses Hyper-Heating INVERTER technology Air-source VRF systems now use advances such as flash-injection technology in the compressor to offer unprecedented levels of capacity and efficiency at low outdoor ambient temperatures. This creates opportunities to replace fossil-fuel-burning equipment in more regions than before. VRF heat pumps and heat-recovery systems help building owners, architects and engineers solve challenges associated with decarbonizing the electric grid as well as emerging building codes, standards and legislation related to decarbonization. Federal standards and programs like ENERGY STAR®, tax credits and utility rebates will continue accelerating adoption of energy-efficient alternates to fossil fuel burning systems. The Decarbonization Challenge The decarbonization challenge is significant and complex, but change is happening now. At Mitsubishi Electric Trane HVAC US, we’re passionate because we recognize the dangers of climate change and acknowledge the significant role we can play in decarbonization efforts. The decarbonization challenge is significant and complex, but change is happening now Legislation, codes, financial incentives, product innovations and environmental advocacy encourage the transition from fossil-fuel-burning equipment and will continue to evolve. We’re doing our part by researching, developing, manufacturing and providing training for the all-electric heat pumps and VRF systems that enable society to enjoy improved comfort while reducing both costs and carbon emissions. Ultimately, strategic electrification can only be successful if it’s associated with personal comfort and prosperous communities. 

Latest Frigidaire HVAC news

Nortek Announces Gibson®, Nu Tone® And Frigidaire® Air Conditioning Units And Heat Pumps
Nortek Announces Gibson®, Nu Tone® And Frigidaire® Air Conditioning Units And Heat Pumps

The introduction of this product series completes the final phase of an overall redesign of Gibson®, NuTone® and Frigidaire® branded 1.5- to 5-ton, single-phase air conditioning units and heat pumps. The air conditioner is available in 13-, 14-, and 16-SEER models, and the heat pump is available in 14- and 16-SEER models. Standard features include Copeland scroll compressors and a liquid line filter-drier for field installation in an accessible position to facilitate easy periodic change-outs. Coil-protecting wire guard Featured aesthetic and functional additions include a coil-protecting wire guard that adds cabinet structural integrity and holds a plastic mesh in place to safeguard against hail and accidental contact damage. The wire guard is secured by the top and three corner screws to promote quiet operation and easy disassembly for coil cleaning access. The series features a barcode on the interior control panel to scan and access all the particular unit’s Nortek website documents.

Nortek Global HVAC Showcases Their Latest Products And Solutions At AHR Expo 2018
Nortek Global HVAC Showcases Their Latest Products And Solutions At AHR Expo 2018

Nortek needed all hands-on deck at the AHR Expo as the company showcased numerous new equipment lines in multiple categories, including split system air conditioners, variable refrigerant flow (VRF) units, data center management modules, heat pumps, gas/electric packaged systems, and more. “Like all manufacturers, we’re focused on keeping up with government regulations across all our product lines,” said Philip Windham, President, Residential HVAC, Nortek Global. “Additionally, we’re aiming to deliver comfort to our customers as efficiently as possible across a wide range of solutions.” packaged rooftop units Mammoth RTUs Our customers can easily replace outdated units with a rugged and innovative design available in our Mammoth brand" Nortek Global HVAC introduced a new line of next-generation Mammoth Light Commercial packaged rooftop units (RTUs) at the expo. Model R7TQ is available in 6-, 7.5-, and 10-ton sizes. These RTUs fit directly on common pre-existing curbs without the need for curb adapters, eliminating delays and saving installation time. Even gas and electric connections are in the same location as many older units, so no service reroutes are required. “We created our rooftop products for contractors, building owners, and facility managers who need low-cost, drop-in direct replacements,” said Dave Garvin, Product Manager at Nortek Global HVAC. “Now, our customers can easily replace outdated units with a rugged and innovative design available in our Mammoth brand.” minimum efficiency standards The unit’s components are factory-installed using Nortek Global HVAC Demand Flow Technology (DFT). Foam panel construction and hinged panel doors are standard. The 1-inch foam panel wall construction ensures IAQ is fiberglass-free, which inhibits mold growth. Panel walls are easy to clean and provide a super-high R-value. High-quality hinges eliminate screws on the roof and keep the access doors in place, even in high-wind conditions. “We believe the construction quality is what makes these rooftop units a real game changer,” continued Garvin. “The many improvements we’ve made for this product line stand to make a major impact for our customers.” At 12.7 IEER, model R7TQ met federal minimum efficiency standards well in advance of the 2018 implementation date. packaged heat pump Q7RF Nortek also showcased its all-new 16-SEER, 12-EER, 8.2-HSPF, energy-efficient Q7RF packaged heat pump. This two-stage heat pump includes all-aluminum Micro-Channel evaporator and condenser coils, which are lightweight, small in size, durable, and reliable in harsh environments. The model is Energy Star listed and qualifies for federal, state, and utility rebates. The Q7RF single-packaged heat pump features a small footprint for ease of installation. Micro-Channel coils contribute to the smaller size of the unit and offer exceptional heat transfer for high efficiency Micro-Channel coils contribute to the smaller size of the unit and offer exceptional heat transfer for high efficiency. Each unit features Nortek Global HVAC’s patented defrost process. Traditional fin-and-tube heat pumps have coil headers on the sides and defrost horizontally. However, in a Micro-Channel heat pump, the coil is rotated 90 degrees so that the headers are at the top and bottom, not the sides. If the defrost started from the top-down, the bottom of the coil would never defrost completely. product management team The Nortek Global HVAC patented process adds a hot gas bypass so that hot gas goes from the top down as well as the bottom up, ensuring the entire coil gets defrosted. The F series is available in the Broan and Frigidaire brands. The PSA/PSH series, is available in the Maytag brand. “Our engineering and product management team worked very hard to pull this together and give customers something new, and they’re really happy about that,” said Windham. “From a design perspective, we thought long and hard about the serviceability of this unit. We spent a lot of time to ensure not only its reliability but how it’s installed and maintained. For example, each panel has only a pair of screws to get to the coils." modular heat pumps VRF Multi-Zone Systems Nortek Global HVAC also exhibited a line of commercial VRF multi-zone systems. The complete line consists of V5 mini VRF heat pumps, V5 modular heat pumps, and V5 heat recovery systems. The V5 VRF systems feature DC inverter-driven compressors for precise temperature control These VRF systems offer contractors and consumers several benefits, including a user-friendly selection software; longer piping lengths for more flexibility on each job; simple, easy-to-install communication wiring; minus 22°F (minus 30°C) heating performance; indoor units that automatically address conditions, eliminating the need to set dipswitches manually; simple debugging/commissioning software; and more. precise temperature control The V5 VRF systems feature DC inverter-driven compressors for precise temperature control. Up to 3,280 feet (1,000 meters) of total piping length and up to 36 indoor connections make them easy to install, network, and maintain. Standard gold and blue fin coating provides increased performance and greater corrosion resistance. The V5 mini VRF systems are designed for light commercial or residential applications. Their compact design and inner profile make them adaptable to tight spaces, and they feature up to 984 feet (300 meters) of total pipe length. Both feature an energy-efficient, ultra-quiet DC inverter compressor and powerful heating capacity in low ambient temperature. These 208/230V condensers are available in 3-, 4-, or 5-ton sizes and will accommodate up to seven, eight, or nine zones. Indoor units are available in wall-mounted, ceiling cassette, console, universal floor/ceiling, and ducted-type units. Commercial VRF systems Nortek exhibited several other products, including the R7TQ gas/electric packaged system “Commercial VRF systems are growing in popularity due to their efficiency and flexibility,” said Keith Clark VRF National Sales Manager, Nortek Global HVAC. “We’re proud to offer a high-value VRF product at a reasonable price, so our contractor customers can be competitive on jobs.” The VRF unit will be marketed under the Gibson brand. “Our VRF operates at minus 22° at 80 percent capacity, which differentiates us from some of the other brands here on the show floor,” Windham said. “We had a customer from Wisconsin recently call and say, ‘We forgot to install the auxiliary heat, but we wanted you to know the building is at 68°. We forgot we had to do it because the building is working so well without it.’ We enjoy hearing success stories like that.” Nortek Solutions Nortek exhibited several other products, including the R7TQ gas/electric packaged system, which was a bronze winner in the HVAC light commercial category of The NEWS’ 14th annual Dealer Design Awards; the 96 percent AFUE Model FG7TE/FG7TN gas furnace, which comes with a factory-installed electronically commutated motor (ECM) and programmable control board; and more.

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