Air Filtration - Expert Commentary

Intelligent HVAC Solutions: Enabling a Safe Return to Work
Intelligent HVAC Solutions: Enabling a Safe Return to Work

Having spent the last few months working from our sofas, dining tables and ironing boards, many of us have become accustomed to the world of remote working. But we’ve now arrived at a point where many businesses are starting to reopen their doors or have plans to do so in the near-future. Employers will be hoping that a return to work will prove productive, reinvigorating the workforce and driving growth. To this end, however, they will need to instill confidence by demonstrating how they can keep employees safe and comfortable. Bringing employees back to work will be complex. For a start, businesses have had to implement a large number of new safety measures in response to COVID-19. However, ensuring safety in the workplace goes beyond adhering to social distancing measures and anti-bacterial cleaning stations. Behind the scenes, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) play a crucial role in facilitating a safe workspace. Whether it’s the systems implemented to limit the spread of the virus, the ongoing servicing of these systems or their wider environmental impact, HVAC solutions and facilities managers (FMs) rest at the heart of a safer return to work. Embracing new strategies for clean air Walking in the building through a new automatic door, most office workers will be greeted with a queue for the lifts and plenty of signage reminding you to sanitise your hands and keep your distance. Some may have their body temperature scanned by a thermal detection camera on entry, which could also count how many people enter to ensure numbers are safe. Others could be met with an anti-virus access point that scans your face using facial recognition rather than a pass, and enforces hand hygiene by dispensing sanitiser before the lifts will open.  Behind the scenes, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) play a crucial role in facilitating a safe workspace All of these measures, however strict, are part of the new normal: ‘contactless’ buildings. Designed to limit the potential spread of COVID-19, facilities managers have plenty of options when it comes to keeping people safe. But not all of them are so apparent when entering a building. Some of the most important measures are those we can’t see. A healthy and safe working environment has always relied on a building’s HVAC infrastructure – temperature control, good air flow, and a reliable level of comfort are top of most office workers’ priority lists. But the pandemic has taken this to a new level of importance. As a critical part of their wider health and safety plan, facilities managers can look to identify strategies to increase clean air levels further. This could include increasing outdoor air circulation to decrease pathogen exposure, with smart air handling units. These will enable managers to bring in more outside air to displace potentially contaminated air, by increasing ventilation and air change rates.  Improving Filtration Methods Improving filtration methods is another possibility, by adding additional filters including high efficiency filters and HEPA filters, to trap more particles and increase the percentage of clean air in a building. Portable HEPA solutions are also an option for those who need more flexibility. In addition to air filtration and circulation, it is also possible to use UV-C lighting to effectively ‘disinfect’ the air or surfaces, using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) to inactivate viral microorganisms. These can be installed brand new or retrofitted into existing facilities, to reduce costs for FMs and speed up implementation. These innovative uses of HVAC to limit the spread of infection could have a huge impact on the health and safety of occupants in any building – and this is by no means limited to offices. Within healthcare and laboratory facilities, for example, solutions like room pressurisation, air change rates, humidity and temperature controls are all critical to reduce contamination in the air and on surfaces. A healthy and safe working environment has always relied on a building’s HVAC infrastructure Safety is an ongoing process No matter which HVAC solutions a facilities manager chooses, it’s not a case of installing them and then waving goodbye. As with any good health and safety strategy, constant monitoring is crucial to ensure building occupants are well looked-after – and this also ensures you can get the most out of HVAC investments. For some this means keeping a close eye on how your HVAC equipment runs, to ensure that they’re reaching optimum performance and delivering the best ROI. Working with a partner who can provide continuous service and monitoring is critical, so that the pressure is off FMs themselves. Especially now, having remote monitoring capabilities is an added bonus, so that minor issues can be fixed without an engineer having to visit the site.  For those with smart technologies in place, such as smart connected chillers, FMs may rather be reliant on predictive maintenance and monitoring tools, which use AI and automation to predict issues before they arise, and ensure equipment runs reliably and downtime can be minimised. Whether in person or remotely, good quality service and maintenance of HVAC equipment goes a long way – both to get the best return on investment, and to keep buildings as safe and comfortable as possible. Enabling a smarter and more sustainable workplace HVAC has always been critical to keeping employees happy and healthy at work – but for a long time this has had a negative impact on the planet. Inefficient HVAC systems can give a building a much bigger carbon footprint than it would ideally have.  75% of organizations plan to increase their investment in energy efficiency and smart building technologies Last year, our Energy Efficiency Indicator survey found that 75% of organizations plan to increase their investment in energy efficiency and smart building technologies. The opportunity, then, to overhaul HVAC systems in order to limit the spread of COVID-19 is also an opportunity to invest in more efficient, greener HVAC technologies, built for the future. Taking a holistic approach to your HVAC equipment is the best way to do this, to ensure efficiency gains can be made across an entire building or estate, by connecting intelligent systems. Chillers, for example, with efficiency and intelligence built in as standard can reduce energy use and carbon emissions for a building, or collection of buildings, helping FMs meet energy targets and keeping costs low. Choosing the optimal HVAC system Under current circumstances, the decisions made by FMs are pivotal in enabling business continuity and will ultimately impact building occupants’ comfort and safety. It should therefore come as no surprise that businesses are paying close attention to every move FMs make. Choosing the optimal HVAC system for your building and ensuring regular servicing and maintenance will prove cost-effective and energy efficient. Not only this, but smart HVAC technologies go a long way in enabling a safer, productive and more sustainable working environment. By picking the right tools for the job, businesses of every type can position themselves for growth while remaining as safe and secure as possible.

Inverter Maintenance For Aircon Engineers
Inverter Maintenance For Aircon Engineers

Inverter driven air conditioning is more energy efficient, cheaper to operate and more profitable to install than its non-inverter driven equivalent. Here Neil Ballinger, head of EMEA at automation parts supplier EU Automation, explains how HVAC engineers can maintain the inverters in their customer’s aircon units. Do you remember cross country at school? It was exhausting; miles of seemingly pointless jogging and sprinting and, if the teacher was not looking, walking. If you were unlucky enough to be born before modern safeguarding measures were introduced, it probably also meant getting lost in the nearest woods.Why isn’t every installation an inverter driven unit, instead of the traditional single stage or dual stage models? My PE teacher, who seemed particularly vicious at the time, but in retrospect just knew about sports science than most, used to make us do something called fartlek as well. This meant long distance runs, incorporating elements of speed training by mixing up sprints with jogs and walks. The worst bit was starting to run again after a walk. That is exactly how the motor in your customer’s air conditioner feel if the units you fit are not inverter controlled. The motor has to act just like a runner doing fartlek — it sprints continuously, operating at full speed until the thermostat tells it the room is cool, then it stops. When the room gets warm, it starts again, powers immediately up to full speed and repeats the process indefinitely. Just like a teenage cross-country runner, it is the starting and stopping that is the tough bit. Furthermore, the unit probably doesn’t have to run at full speed to keep the room at the correct temperature, if the motor were inverter controlled it would speed up and slow down as the temperature fluctuates. Why isn’t all aircon inverter driven? We all know that inverter driven aircon is better than its non-inverter driven cousins. It can provide heating as well as cooling and the lifetime cost of use is less for the customer — because their energy bills stay low. The cost of installation is also higher because it is a more complex job, so it works out better for the contractor. It’s a win-win. The research firm Technavio even lists it as one of the key technologies driving growth in the HVAC market in its annual reports every year. So, the only question is, why isn’t every installation an inverter driven unit, instead of the traditional single stage or dual stage models?When contractors contact EU Automation to buy automation parts, for the units they maintain, they have given us another reason: maintenance Cost is a factor, but when contractors contact EU Automation to buy replacement motors and inverters, and other automation parts, for the units they maintain, they have given us another reason: maintenance. As HVAC engineers, we are not necessarily specialists in power electronics, and this makes inverter maintenance daunting. Microcontrollers and IGBTs (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors) are not beyond us by any means, but they can be intimidating. Personally, I would back an electrical or heating engineer over an electronics specialist in a problem-solving contest all day long; but that doesn’t solve the problem at hand. Furthermore, while we are experts in air conditioning brands, and know our Daikins and Grees from our Mitsubishis and Fujitsus, we don’t necessarily have contacts at the inverter manufacturers. Amtech, Danfoss, Vacon and Yaskawa are all names we know, but the local dealer for any of them is probably not in your phone book. This is especially true if the unit you need is from a first-generation inverter driven aircon unit and well over a decade old. While we are experts in air conditioning brands, and know our Daikins and Grees from our Mitsubishis and Fujitsus, we don’t necessarily have contacts at the inverter manufacturers Maintenance techniques While inverter maintenance can be daunting, it isn’t difficult. The tools you will need most often are nothing more than a rag and a spanner, while the more esoteric kit is stuff you probably carry anyway, a laptop, vacuum and a Fluke meter. Before you start, remember that while we tend to refer to an inverter as an inverter, the manufacturers themselves, and many of the sources of information online, often refer to them as VSDs (Variable Speed Drives), VFDs (Variable Frequency Drives) or just plain old drives. As a result, when you are searching online for a video to explain something, it’s worth using all three of those terms, alongside the inverter manufacturer’s name and the problem to make sure you get the right result.While inverter maintenance can be daunting, it isn’t difficult When you do move on to maintenance, step one is simple; make sure that the unit is free of dust. This is as easy as vacuuming the heatsink with an ESD (Electrostatic Discharge) vacuum cleaner when you perform routine maintenance or investigate a problem. While you are checking for build up of dust and daily grime, check the filters. They will probably have to be replaced during annual maintenance, but high use might mean they need to be replaced more often. The control panel itself should be well ventilated and free of dust as well, if it isn’t it can overheat, which is the number one cause of inverter damage and the most common reason contractors contact us for replacement units. Before you put your vacuum and duster away, you should make sure that the inverter unit’s location is clean and as sheltered from the elements as possible. Because it’s normally situated on a roof, it’s not going to be perfect, but the units are designed to take a limited battering. That doesn’t mean it’s okay for them to be covered in leaves, surrounded by rubbish or immediately beneath the guttering outlet though! Before you put your vacuum and duster away, you should make sure that the inverter unit’s location is clean and as sheltered from the elements as possible Get out the spanner Once you’ve finished these steps, you are done with dusting for now, it’s time to get out your screwdriver and your spanner. Step one is to make sure the fans on the inverter are operating normally, without noise and with nothing blocking their rotation. The fan keeps the internal components running effectively, just as it does on PC, and if its function is impaired the capacitors will overheat and the inverter will fail.When you install or maintain an inverter on an air conditioning system, it is a sensible precaution to back up the drive parameters to your laptop The next job is to grab your spanner and make sure the power terminals are on tight. Loose connections cause arcing, overheating and even melting of components and are easily checked during any kind of maintenance and repair. While we are still in the realms of the work your apprentice can do with their eyes closed, you should also make sure that the inverter’s removable LCD control pad is stored sensibly and not continually attached to the drive. If it remains attached, there is a chance the display will stay on permanently, which means that when you need it to diagnose a problem, it will probably already be burnt out. Break out the laptop When you install or maintain an inverter on an air conditioning system, it is a sensible precaution to back up the drive parameters to your laptop. It takes minutes and is normally done by using the removable LCD control. In fact, it’s often as simple as selecting ‘PARs’ and then ‘BACKUP’ from the menu. If you struggle, there are lots of videos on YouTube, like this one, which explain the process for each drive. As a result, if the inverter ever does need replacing, you can whip out your backed up parameters and order a new or refurbished one easily, before reloading the parameters to the replacement and getting up and running in no time. Your customers will think you are a power electronics genius, as well as a HVAC expert, and they will be loyal for life; especially of you save them on a hot day! If you follow these simple measures, you will find that the inverters in your customer’s air conditioning units last much longer and no motors will have to run the equivalent of a cross country, thanks to a lack of inverter control.

COVID-19 and the Renaissance of Digitalized HVAC
COVID-19 and the Renaissance of Digitalized HVAC

It is said that the COVID-19 pandemic has been one of the single biggest driving forces behind the digitalization of industries ever seen. And although not new within HVAC infrastructures – especially within the food retail environment where it has been rolled out extensively – remote management and automation of HVAC systems is increasingly being used to support supermarket responses to COVID-19. From air filtration through to dynamic scheduling, digitalization of HVAC within the food retail sector is going through something of a renaissance. Pre-COVID Digitalization Software solutions that use Internet of Things (IoT) technology to analyze data from HVAC infrastructures, for example, are common in food retail stores. These solutions work by monitoring mission critical aspects of HVAC systems, from simple temperature data through to complex asset monitoring. This data can then either be fed back to the retailer for them to perform their own analysis or, using more advanced IoT technology, can be used to enact automated HVAC outcomes. Software solutions that use IoT technology to analyze data from HVAC infrastructures are common in food retail stores From preventing HVAC asset’s overworking – and therefore expending too much energy – through to detecting the first stages of a fault and alerting the relevant maintenance engineers, automation has been shown to deliver numerous benefits. These combine to serve the retailer’s primary purposes; enhancing the consumers in-store experience, improving the bottom line and decreasing energy usage to lower carbon footprint. But not only is the digitalization of HVAC helping food retailers drive down costs and energy, advances in areas such as air filtration and dynamic scheduling have meant that it is also being seen as a potential solution to COVID-19 related issues. Filtering Out the Virus Air filtration is a primary focus when looking for ways to keep internal spaces free from pathogens. While not exactly a new feature for HVAC systems, food retailers have been increasingly working towards implementing or improving their existing air filtration techniques in their stores. The solution to keeping air clean and fresh is actually quite straightforward and relies on the same technology that many stores already use to monitor CO2. Advances in areas such as air filtration and dynamic scheduling have meant that HVAC is being seen as a potential solution to COVID-19 By connecting CO2 monitors to a central controls panel (the technical way of describing the place where all of the sensor data is collected and, in some cases, analyzed), sensors are able to detect the CO2 levels instore, signal if they begin to drift past a pre-determined base level, and automatically alert the HVAC systems to provide more fresh air into the store. This is a simple process of optimization. Additional sensors detect when fresh air is either too humid, hot or cold to be filtered into the store and rectify this by automatically adjusting the HVAC. Essentially, monitoring CO2 and air quality levels makes sure the air in a store is constantly fresh and filtered to keep the chances of airborne transmission as low as possible without causing the HVAC systems to expend any more energy than is necessary. Research has shown that COVID-19 spreads through small respiratory droplets that are released into the air from an infected person when coughing, talking or even breathing. Within a store environment therefore, where surface contamination and proximity to other people are likely to increase the chances of transmitting the virus, optimized fresh air flow to dilute indoor air is desirable. By detecting higher levels of CO2 within the air which in turn increases the chances of pathogens floating around, food retailers can automate their HVAC systems to filtrate the air and significantly reduce chances of transmission. Dynamic HVAC Response Air filtration isn’t the only way that food retailers are combining digitalization and HVAC systems to help them navigate the ‘new normal’. With store opening times continually changing, fewer people inside a store at any one time and staff performing additional and stricter clean regimes after hours, the requirements for optimum store temperature have moved from static to dynamic. Before the pandemic, HVAC systems would have to keep an average non-24 hour store at the optimum temperature for between say, 7am and 11pm, and would have to work a little harder to deliver more air into the store during the lunch time rush and post-work peaks – a mostly predictable routine. Research has shown that COVID-19 spreads through small respiratory droplets that are released into the air from an infected person Now, however, with adjusted store schedules and social distancing regulations, the footfall and peak traffic times have changed dramatically. Through digitally enabled remote management of HVAC temperatures and schedules, new schedules could be deployed across the estate at the touch of a button. Real-time monitoring of in-store temperatures and the volume of people inside also enables HVAC systems to run more efficiently by stopping them from filtering in more outside air than is necessary in a shop that contains fewer customers than normal. IoT solutions are ensuring HVAC infrastructures are running efficiently, saving energy, helping a retailer’s bottom line and most importantly, ensuring the comfort and safety of customers and colleagues. However, as retailers look for solutions to the challenges posed by the post-COVID landscape, digitalized HVAC is breathing fresh air into the industry. From improved air filtration to dynamic schedule monitoring, digitalized HVAC systems are proving to be an important tool in a food retailer’s arsenal as they navigate the new normal.

Latest Carrier Corporation news

Carrier Corporation Announces Release Of AquaSnap Air-Cooled Scroll Chiller Range With R-32 Refrigerant
Carrier Corporation Announces Release Of AquaSnap Air-Cooled Scroll Chiller Range With R-32 Refrigerant

Carrier AquaSnap scroll chiller range is now available with R-32 refrigerant, which improves performance and reduces direct greenhouse gas emissions by up to 80%, compared to the previous range using R-410A refrigerant. The innovative air-cooled range meets requirements for the European F-Gas phase-down of HFC refrigerants and Ecodesign requirements for 2021. Carrier, a globally renowned provider of high-technology heating, air conditioning and refrigeration solutions, is a part of Carrier Global Corporation, an international organization in the field of innovative heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, fire, security and building automation technologies. AquaSnap scroll chiller range Carrier selected R-32 refrigerant, which has a low global warming potential (GWP) of 675 Carrier selected R-32 refrigerant, which has a low global warming potential (GWP) of 675, for use in commercial scroll chiller ranges. R-32 has a GWP that is two thirds less than the GWP of the current R-410A version and this change, combined with a significant system refrigerant charge reduction – up to 30% – allows for an exceptional 80% reduction in direct greenhouse gas emissions. The AquaSnap range reaches an outstanding Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER12/7) of up to 5.33 and a Seasonal Coefficient of Performance (SCOP) of up to 3.77. The range covers capacities from 40 kW to 940 kW. Equipped with R-32 refrigerant “Carrier’s AquaSnap range with R-32 refrigerant allows our customers to anticipate compliance to Ecodesign 2021 requirements while supporting the next phase down steps of the European F-Gas regulation for HFC,” said Didier Genois, Vice President, Carrier HVAC-Commercial (Europe), adding “The range also provides customers with best-in-class performance in heating and cooling conditions.” The AquaSnap with R-32 refrigerant can meet the needs of a wide scope of applications. The range ½ covers an extended operating map, up to 48 degrees Celsius outdoor air temperature, and features Carrier’s best-in class technologies for maximum efficiency in all conditions, including: - Multiple scroll compressors able to match load requirements. - Brazed asymmetric plate heat exchangers with true dual-circuit design for high performance in both full and partial-load conditions. - Smart energy monitoring function providing real time capacity provided and energy consumption measurement. - Greenspeed intelligence on premium versions: variable-speed fans and variable-speed pumps.

How BluEdge Enhances Service For Carrier’s Customers
How BluEdge Enhances Service For Carrier’s Customers

Carrier launched its BluEdge tiered service program after hearing from customers looking for a streamlined experience and a reliable, invested partner throughout the equipment’s lifespan. Carrier conducted a customer survey before launching BluEdge, and the common theme was a need for Carrier to articulate more clearly its value proposition and to simplify its service offering. Carrier launched BluEdge at the end of June in three businesses within the company, including the North America Commercial HVAC Service segment. The global pandemic has led to changes in priorities and requirements for commercial building spaces - indoor air quality is a chief concern for both owners and occupants. air quality assessments “We are incorporating Carrier’s Healthy Buildings solutions - such as air quality assessments and retrofits for upgraded filtration and controls - into the BluEdge service tiers,” says Ajay Agrawal is the Senior Vice President of Strategy & Services at Carrier. “One of the easiest ways to ensure high-quality indoor air is to keep a building’s HVAC system properly maintained.” The backbone of the BluEdge suite of HVAC services is Carrier SMART Service Carrier's HVAC business has signed up more than 200 service agreements since the launch of BluEdge and introduced a specialized first-year service offering on qualifying commercial equipment purchases in the U.S. and Canada. Technology helps to enable BluEdge. The backbone of the BluEdge suite of HVAC services is Carrier SMART Service, an Internet-of-things-enabled connected service platform. monitoring HVAC performance Every applied chiller leaving the factory is enabled for connectivity, and Carrier is embarking on a retrofit campaign to connect previously installed equipment. The company analyzes hundreds of parameters generated by connected equipment in real time using SMART Service, and they also monitor HVAC performance in BluEdge Command Centers (currently in Bengaluru, India, and Kennesaw, Georgia). Carrier is integrating and building up both capabilities to create an even more seamless experience for BluEdge customers - this includes technologies such as remote intervention, prognostics, and artificial intelligence (AI). cost-Effective solutions “At Carrier, we put the customer front and center, and we are constantly soliciting feedback for how to improve our products and services,” says Agrawal. “Carrier’s vantage over the total HVAC lifecycle enables us to provide innovative and cost-effective solutions for our customers. Maintaining our own equipment allows us to unlock even more value for customers.” BluEdge is designed to appeal to all customers, especially those who might not typically go to the OEM for service plans or even break-fix emergencies. The flexibility of the BluEdge offerings - which include Core, Enhance and Elite levels - ensures that all customers can find a suitable Carrier service program. Carrier is prepared to work with each customer to customize a maintenance program tailored to specific needs and budget, says Agrawal. Customizable maintenance programs We know how to optimally run it, and we know how to maintain peak performance" The BluEdge tiers are designed to appeal to customers in three broad levels. The Core tier is geared towards the customer who primarily maintains their HVAC equipment with in-house technicians - the Carrier customer portal, performance dashboards, and remote inspections can assist those in-house techs. On the other end of the spectrum is the Elite tier, which is for the customer that wants a comprehensive maintenance program. They can hand over the keys to their utility room, and Carrier takes care of the rest. The Enhance offering - the middle tier - is flexible enough for the customer who wants something a bit less comprehensive but still requires Carrier’s expertise. Carrier knows its equipment inside and out, having developed the core technologies, designed the equipment, manufactured it, and installed it, says Agrawal. “We know how to optimally run it, and we know how to maintain peak performance,” he says.  remote monitoring centers At the same time, Carrier has built up and is rapidly expanding its service capabilities - including thousands of technicians, a global replacement parts distribution network, and remote monitoring centers called BluEdge Command Centers to analyze and optimize equipment performance. Carrier is uniquely positioned to offer customers an end-to-end, total lifecycle solution for HVAC equipment and building solutions, says Agrawal. The Carrier BluEdge service platform does not just apply to HVAC; they are also rolling out BluEdge across Carrier’s entire portfolio, including products within the refrigeration and fire and security segments.

Carrier And EMSI Achieve WELL Health-Safety Rating For Facility Operations And Management
Carrier And EMSI Achieve WELL Health-Safety Rating For Facility Operations And Management

The International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) announces that Carrier, a provider of heating, air-conditioning and refrigeration solutions, and its subsidiary EMSI are the first organizations in China to achieve the WELL Health-Safety Rating for Facility Operations and Management. Properties in multiple cities including offices and a factory add to the list of over 500 facilities across the world taking proactive measures focused on prevention and preparedness, resilience and recovery in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Stakeholder engagement strategies The rating, which is third-party verified by Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI) signifies Carrier/EMSI have prioritized health and safety in managing and operating their offices and manufacturing facilities, instilling trust and confidence among Carrier/EMSI employees, customers and other stakeholders. Carrier/EMSI are among the initial group of global organizations that enrolled in the WELL Health-Safety Rating program announced by IWBI in early July, 2020. The WELL Health-Safety Rating is an evidence-based, third-party verified rating for new and existing buildings and space types and is focused on operational policies, maintenance protocols, emergency plans and stakeholder engagement strategies. Long-Term health and safety The WELL Health-Safety Rating is designed to guide and empower the actions of large and small businesses “WELL Health-Safety Rating is designed to guide organizations in preparing their spaces to effectively address health and safety concerns not only due to COVID-19, but also other infectious diseases,” said Rick Fedrizzi, IWBI chairman and CEO. “Organizations like Carrier/EMSI are leading the charge to re-instill confidence in the way our spaces are managed and operated, and this kind of trust empowers the business bottom line.” Adapted from features in the WELL Building Standard (WELL) that focus on facility maintenance and operations, the WELL Health-Safety Rating is designed to guide and empower the actions of large and small businesses alike in taking the necessary steps to maintain facilities that prioritize the health and safety of their staff, visitors and stakeholders. It also serves as an annual process that supports efforts to promote long-term health and safety. Healthy indoor environments “Being the first to have achieved WELL Health-Safety Rating in China underlines Carrier’s long- term commitment to prioritizing the health and safety of our employees, clients and all other stakeholders,” said Titus Yu, managing director at Carrier North Asia. “The rating aligns Carrier’s focus on promoting healthy indoor environments with IWBI’s internationally recognized standard and can guide us aiming for best practices in our own operations.” He said the experience to achieve the rating also provides valuable expertise for its newly launched Carrier Healthy Buildings Program through which Carrier works to advance healthier indoor air quality to clients in critical sectors such as commercial, health care, education, retail and marine transportation. Human health sustainability The award is a testament to our commitment that EMSI follows the world’s leading standard" Carrier/EMSI enrolled their offices in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and a new Carrier factory in Shanghai for WELL Health-Safety Rating. EMSI, a Carrier subsidiary and a green and healthy building consultancy based in China, implemented the rating requirements for both organizations. “Implementing the WELL Health-Safety Rating for our own facilities provided us an opportunity to familiarize our staff with the knowledge and nuances necessary to achieve the rating,” said Dr. Yi Chun Huang, EMSI general manager. “The award is a testament to our commitment that EMSI follows the world’s leading standard and the best practice when it comes to human health sustainability.” Monitoring indoor air quality To achieve the WELL Health-Safety Rating, Carrier/EMSI submitted documents for review that met feature requirements in the following areas: Cleaning and sanitization procedures that include supporting hand washing in contact-free settings, optimized cleaning practice, and providing hand sanitizer; Emergency preparedness programs, which entail the provision of PPE, and include a comprehensive re-entry plan after emergency events; Health service resources, which promote employee well-being through health screenings, and ensure smoke-free environments; Air and water quality management, which includes the assessment of HVAC risk factors for virus transmission, monitoring indoor air and water quality; Stakeholder engagement and communications, which include promoting health literacy among employees. “Leadership is demonstrated through practice, and Carrier/EMSI have proven to all organizations in China that WELL Health-Safety Rating is for all types of facilities,” said Xue Ya, president of IWBI Asia. Integrating actionable insights Created by IWBI, the WELL Health-Safety Rating is informed by guidance developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), global disease control and prevention centers and emergency management agencies, recognized standard-making bodies, such as ASTM International and ASHRAE, and academic and research institutions. IWBI has leveraged insights from its Task Force on COVID-19, established at the outset of the pandemic to help business and building leaders integrate actionable insights and proven strategies in the fight against COVID-19 and other respiratory infections. Owners, operators and tenants can pursue the WELL Health-Safety Rating for projects independently, seamlessly using the rating as a stepping stone to achievement of WELL Certification, or integrate the rating as a milestone within their WELL Certification or WELL Portfolio journey.

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